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Kimlin Johnson, Applauded Author & Civil Rights Activist, Supports Nike’s Colin Kaepernick Campaign

Kimlin Charise Johnson

“Nothing is more authentic than when a professional football player takes a knee to stop police violence against Black males and females.” ~ Kimlin Johnson

LOS ANGELES, CA, UNITED STATES, October 8, 2018 /EINPresswire.com/ -- Acclaimed author of Authenticity, Accountability & Ambitions: Speaking the Truth Through a Black Woman's Eyes (AAA), and Civil Rights activist, Kimlin Charise Johnson, supports Nike’s controversial “Just Do It” campaign featuring famed footballer Colin Kaepernick.

“Nothing is more authentic than when a professional football player takes a knee to stop police violence against Black males and females,” Johnson applauds. “Instead of taking a knee as Kaepernick did, my book documents what we as a society need to do to make America better.”

The Nike ads feature the quarterback who started a movement among NFL players by kneeling during the National Anthem in protest police brutality and racial injustice. The message was heard loud and clear amongst Nike’s core customers— Millennials and younger men, which represent two-thirds of the company’s customers.

"Nike communicated to them in a way that is authentic, culturally relevant, experiential and emotionally engaging," Johnson continues. “The word authenticity is popping up everywhere. That phrase encapsulates AAA’s core message. The parallels are amazing.”

Consumers seem to agree, as many people are in support of Nike's decision to use Kaepernick. Not to mention the fact that Nike gained 170,000 Instagram followers, and that an Instagram post featuring Kaepernick was the second-most liked post in Nike's history, behind a post about the World Cup. Experts say that the campaign has increased core customers' loyalty to Nike and has raised awareness for the brand.

“Consequently, I just bought my first pair of Nike’s in years because they supported Kaepernick,” Johnson concludes. “Change has to start somewhere. Whereas Nike’s logo is “Just Do It”, AAA’s logo is “Change is Now.”

Aurora DeRose
Aurora DeRose
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